What is Mar-Anon?

Over the years, some of us have tried to find support in Al-Anon or in Nar-Anon. Many desperate families have contacted Marijuana Anonymous (M.A.) looking for help.  Mar-Anon is a 12-Step program designed specifically for those affected by another's marijuana use.

 

Questions to determine if Mar-Anon could help you:

1. Do you think someone in your life is addicted to marijuana?
2. Is marijuana use a source of conflict in your relationship?
3. Are you enabling chronic marijuana use - financially or emotionally?
4. Do you feel bad when other people doubt that marijuana can be addictive or harmful?
5. Do you worry that the addict has retreated from your relationship or from life?
6. Do you think marijuana use has changed the addict's personality?
7. Have you ever been embarrassed or ashamed by the marijuana user's habit?
8. Have you ever hoped the addict  would "grow out of" using?
9. Do you try to get the addict to seek treatment for emotional/mental issues?
10. Have you attended other 12-step meetings for support and felt your specific concerns were not addressed?

 

How it works

Mar-Anon is a fellowship of those affected by  another person's marijuana use.  Its foundation is the Twelve Steps, adapted from Marijuana Anonymous, which can be a powerful, life-changing tool.  We come together to work the steps and offer hope, comfort an support for other members.  We are not a religious group, instead we use the steps as a path of self-discovery and personal change.

 

Twelve Steps of Mar-Anon *

Here are the suggested Twelve Steps for Mar-Anon:

1. We admitted we were powerless over marijuana, that our lives had become unmanageable.
2. Came to believe that a power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of a higher power.
4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
5. Admitted to this higher power, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
6. Were entirely ready to have these defects of character removed.
7. Humbly asked to have our shortcomings removed.
8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
9. Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
10. Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong, promptly admitted it.
11. Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with our program, our lives and our higher power.
12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to family and friends of marijuana addicts and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

 

DOs and DON'Ts (adapted from Al-Anon)

DON'T take an addict's choices or behavior personally
DON'T try to manipulate or control the marijuana addict
DON'T allow yourself to get stuck in a judgmental, contemptuous or bitter mindset

DO keep the focus on yourself
DO take care of yourself physically, emotionally and spiritually
DO try to understand the nature of addiction as a disease
DO attend open Marijuana Anonymous meetings and read their literature
DO attend Al-Anon meetings and read their literature
DO respect the anonymity of all 12-Step program members and the confidentiality of meetings
DO contact Mar-Anon!

REMEMBER:
You don't have to do this alone!

 

 

 

 

*The Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous have been reprinted and adapted with the permission of Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc. (“AAWS”). Permission to reprint and adapt the Twelve Steps does not mean that Alcoholics Anonymous is affiliated with this program. A.A. is a program of recovery from alcoholism only - use of A.A.’s Steps or an adapted version in connection with programs and activities which are patterned after A.A., but which address other problems, or use in any other non-A.A. context, does not imply otherwise.
THE TWELVE STEPS OF ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
1. We admitted we were powerless over alcohol—that our lives had become unmanageable.
2. Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.
4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
5. Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
6. Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
7. Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.
8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
9. Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
10. Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
11. Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God, as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.
12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these Steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.